Posts Tagged ‘TG4’

Seachtar na Cásca – The Easter Seven

15 October 2010

Contributed by Joanne McEntee 

‘As we gather in the chapel here in old Kilmainham Jail,                            I think about these past few weeks, oh will they say we’ve failed?’

Although initially deemed a failure, the rising orchestrated by the ‘Easter 7’ in April 1916 proved pivotal in Ireland’s struggle against British rule. The seven signatories of the Proclamation, Thomas J. Clarke, Sean Mac Diarmada, James Connolly, Patrick H. Pearse, Éamonn Ceannt, Thomas MacDonagh and Joseph Plunkett have been resurrected once again in the first major television series of the event in over forty years.

‘1916 Seachtar na Cásca’ written by Aindrias Ó Cathasaigh, directed by Dathaí Keane, and produced in conjunction with Abú media productions had its first public airing at the 22nd Galway Film Fleadh. TG4 now brings this seven part historical documentary to a wider audience every Wednesday night at 21.30 with repeat showings on Saturdays at 21.30. The series runs from 22 September until 3 November. Read more

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Ireland’s Greatest?

2 April 2010

Contributed by Adrian Grant

RTE’s output of historical documentaries in recent years has been the subject of some discussion. ‘The Killings at Coolacrease’ (2007) and ‘If Lynch Had Invaded’ (2009) both stimulated a lot of discussion among historians and others alike. RTE is now asking ‘who do you think is the greatest Irish person ever?’ and has provided a shortlist of forty for the public to choose from. The five figures who receive the most votes will have hour-long documentaries produced about their lives before the public is asked to make the call on who was, or is, Ireland’s Greatest. We can also look forward to the fact that these five documentaries will be fronted by a ‘well-known personality’ who will interpret and champion their chosen figure. This is a very similar format to the 2002 BBC show “Great Britons” which was highly popular and notable here for its inclusion of two Irishmen, Bono and Bob Geldof. The two lads are included on the RTE list and there is a danger that Bono might disappear up his own arse if he wins. This is unlikely though since most Irish people don’t seem to like him very much. Read more

Rapairi on TG4

13 November 2009

By Lisa Marie Griffith

10111The first of TG4’s new series ‘Rapairi’, an examination of  Irish outlaws from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, aired last night. The opening show made ambitious claims. The show aims to look at 6 outlaws, tories and raparees as they were referred to in the proclamations of the day, their lives and to establish the reality behind the folklore. It also aims to examine why Irish people are disrespectful to the law. As a social historian of the eighteenth century I have often come across ‘tories and raparees’ in my research. These are men who are on the run, have skipped a court hearing, have escaped from jail and who are known and wanted criminals. Many of these men went into hiding, escaped to rural Ireland and lived like bandits and the term basically described villains and criminals. TG4, however, chose to focus on the raparee heroes of early modern Ireland- gentlemen who had been pushed outside the law because of some injustice that they had suffered.

I will have to admit I was a little bemused by TG4’s twenty-first century version of a raparee; the Rossport 5. Interspersed with their attempt to explain what an early-modern raparee was the programme had clips of the Rossport 5 outside court and anti-Shell-protests. Read more